Vol. 6 No 3 – May 2015

WWF CEO: Set big goals and you’ll figure it out

WWF CEO: Set big goals and you’ll figure it out
By Bill Hatton
Most CR, CSR and sustainability pros know that incremental goal-setting can help “move the needle.” But most people want more than that. If you want to go beyond moving the needle and create big change, you’ll need big goals, even if you don’t know how to get there.
That’s according to Carter Roberts, CEO, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), who spoke at the recent GreenBiz 2015 Forum in Phoenix. He discussed keys for improving resource-use in the supply chain.
“The odds of your success are greater if you set big goals than if you set little ones,” says Roberts. “If you set a little one and achieve it, it’s inconsequential. But if you set a big one and you get 50-60 percent of the way there, then you can change the world. What we found is that those companies, whether McDonald’s or Unilever or Coke--if you set a big audacious goal and aren’t sure how to get there, you will figure it out along the way.

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Editor’s Note: Yellow card, red card, no card

Yellow card, red card, no card

Bill Hatton Editorial Director

Corporate Responsibility Magazine announces the 16th annual 100 Best Corporate Citizens List this issue. We measure transparency and success. You have to do well as a business, and you have to do so while behaving the way a good citizen behaves. That is, you don’t leave a mess for someone else to clean up. We use 303 data points and our methodology is ruthlessly objective. You either do or do not have the policies and disclosures in place. You don’t sign up for the ranking, and the only participation is companies are allowed is to double-check our data and ask for corrections.

We also have yellow cards and red cards. These signify something went wrong during the year. This part by definition is subjective, and so we use analogies. Red cards and yellow cards are like soccer cards issued for fouls during play.

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CEO’s Letter: Microsoft offers a Window to Transparency and Apple Has Worms

Microsoft offers a Window to Transparency and Apple Has Worms


Celebrating Transparency and Decrying Opacity
By Elliot H. Clark
It is the 16th year of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens List. Again we review more than 300,000 data points developed about every company in the Russell 1000. This issue is replete with explanations of the methodology and our disclosure of the data points and the weightings of each category of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens List.
What is most interesting as we look at the Russell 1000 is how well the large-cap companies perform on this and other ratings. They clearly have the money to invest in the infrastructure to measure and disclose their data. What we often overlook is the issue of willingness. Being good corporate citizens is important to these large companies and their leadership. Yes, it is also good business, good for reputation and good for the future of markets to invest in society, but that does not diminish the fact that they care about being good citizens.

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From Where I Sit

From Where I Sit


By Jim Murren
Chairman and CEO, MGM Resorts International
In March, I participated in two milestone events that will change the landscape and economy of two communities in Massachusetts and Maryland.
In Maryland, MGM Resorts International celebrated the hiring of the 1,000th construction worker of MGM National Harbor, slated to open in 2016. And in Massachusetts, I participated in a ground-breaking ceremony for MGM Springfield, which is on track to open in 2017.
Both resorts will be unique and complementary to the environments in which they are being built. MGM Resorts will bring together and unite the culture, art and history of the regions, along with new commerce, new business, and new hope.
As a company, our character is not just to be in a community, but to be an integral part of it, with their hopes being our hopes, their wishes our wishes, and their futures linked with ours.

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Executive Director’s Report

Executive Director’s Report


By Allie Williams
This is a very exciting time of year for CR practitioners, some of whom are buried deep in report writing for their company’s Sustainability, CSR, Corporate Citizen or Annual Reports. The Corporate Responsibility Association engages with many companies struggling to find a balance with survey fatigue, launching of a new strategic CR initiative and submitting the proper documentation to the ratings & rankings research firms in hopes of their deserved recognition. For the past 16 years, this publication has been responsible for announcing the list of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens and this year, 31 of the companies we celebrate are part of the Corporate Responsibility Association.
I want to thank all the members of the CRA for their passion and dedication to making corporate responsibility part of your corporate culture.

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How to make popular restaurants more responsible?

The steps Yum!. Brands is taking to boost nutrition and protect the environment


By Allie Williams
Like a lot of businesses, the Yum! Brands (KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell) business model is wide open to certain kinds of criticism. As good as their food is, is it nutritious? What impact does the business have on the environment?
Let’s start with nutrition. What can a company that sells what is commonly called fast food do to improve nutrition?
The approach of Yum! is to disclose nutritional value, improve it where they can – and remember why people come to their stores. Nutrition is part of a larger process of corporate citizenship encompassing how it treats employees, its supply chain and the environment.
“We’re providing balanced options in our restaurants around the globe and we’re being transparent so consumers can make informed decisions about our food, including providing nutritional information in our restaurants and online,” says Laurie Schalow, vice president of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for Yum!
Some steps they’ve taken:
• “We were the first in the country to call on Congress to enact uniform national menu labeling.

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The 100 Best Corporate Citizens

The 100 Best Corporate Citizens


Our 16th annual ranking of transparency, accountability and business performance
By The Editors
Corporate Responsibility Magazine is pleased to present our 16th annual list of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens. This year’s 100 Best List began with our research
team documenting 303 data points of disclosure and performance measurements for the entire Russell 1000. The data was gleaned from publicly available information and each company was ranked in seven categories:
• Environment
• Climate Change
• Employee Relations
• Human rights
• Corporate governance
• Financial performance, and
• Philanthropy.
More details on our methodology follow the List.
We offer the companies named to the 2015 100 Best List our congratulations. They delivered on their commitments to transparency and accountability in highly competitive industries.

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Digging Deeper

How Mosaic makes responsibility work


By Bill Hatton
The Mosaic Company’s mission is to help the world grow the food it needs. The company’s phosphate and potash crop nutrients help farmers feed the growing global population—which is expected to increase from 7 billion people today to 9 billion people by 2050. That’s a big challenge for agriculture, and crop nutrients are critical to meeting the challenge: fertilizers account for half of all crop yields produced today.
Such a mission requires long-term thinking—and a long- term commitment to responsible operation.
Mosaic mines, produces, sells and delivers about 20 million tonnes of fertilizer each year to customers in approximately 40 countries. That process is complex: For example, the company’s potash mines in Saskatchewan, Canada, are among the largest and deepest mines in the world, with one mine alone reaching depths of 4,000 feet and including more than 2,000 miles of underground tunnels.

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Surprises in the Supply Chain

Lessons learned from the first year of conflict-minerals reporting


By Bill Hatton
(Editor’s Note: Rich Goode is Ernst & Young’s national subject matter expert on the responsible sourcing of conflict minerals, and a senior manager in EY’s climate change and sustainability services practice. He also teaches about greenhouse gas emissions management at Harvard Extension School. Last year, EY reviewed the first year of conflict-minerals reports delivered by companies to the SEC, and uncovered some difficulties companies faced as they learn how to comply with the new rule. Goode spoke with Corporate Responsibility Magazine to give an update of how the second year of required reporting is going and to outline some of the key issues in digging into the supplier chain. His perspective is valuable for anyone looking to learn more about their supply chain.)
CR: Your June 2014 EY “To the Point” report on conflict minerals showed that many initial SEC filings indicated that companies were unable to determine the origin of 3TG in their supply chains.

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What Gets Employees Engaged – Or Dis-Engaged?

What Gets Employees Engaged – Or Dis-Engaged?

By Bill Hatton


Sustainable Workforce
Employee engagement: There have been many words for the concept over the years. Back in the 90s, it was “Be Proactive.” Earlier, it was any of these: Take initiative;
get your head in the game; play to win, don’t play not to lose; apply yourself; buy the ticket, take the ride; grab the bull by the horns; once more into the breach; honest day’s work for honest day’s pay; mindfulness; engage!
The concept is clear: Get fully involved in the task. Engaged employees are not just going through the motions until they can do something else. They are not distracted. They are here, now, personally immersed in doing what they are doing. Managers have been trying to get others fully engaged as long as there has been management.
So what gets in the way? The same-old: distractions (there’s always something easier and more compelling), excuses (obstacles that either provided a reason to
check out), disincentives/wrong incentives (management measures and rewards the wrong things), and sometimes, issues of character.

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